Posts Tagged ‘media’

25 Years and Beyond

08/08/2020

At 2pm on the 9 August, 2020, Bush Radio marks the 25th anniversary of broadcasting with a license from the broadcast authority.

Read: Bush Radio, Africa’s oldest community radio station project

9 August 1995 – South Africa’s first National Women’s Day – was chosen because we wanted to honour all the women who had been instrumental in giving rise to the community radio sector and establishing Bush Radio, in particular.

Listen to an audio documentary on Bush Radio and community radio

This year COVID19 has proven the importance of community media in helping the fight against the pandemic, by being a vital source of information and supporting the communities we serve through our programming.

Our events to celebrate 25 years of broadcasting were put on hold, but now we have an opportunity to reflect on how far we’ve and look towards the next – dare we say it – quarter of a century!

READ: Radio, community and identity in #SouthAfrica: A rhizomatic study of Bush Radio in Cape Town – By Dr Tanja Bosch

During the pandemic, we can be together via 89.5FM and stream on http://www.bushradio.co.za

The Struggle to launch community radio – Partial Eclipse

Thank you for your support, and keep safe.

SUPPORT OUR WORK

Basic protective measures against the Novel #Coronavirus – click here

Official websites for accurate information regarding COVID19:

COVID-19 Corona Virus South African Resource Portal

Regulations and Guidelines – Coronavirus Covid-19

World Health Organisation

Western Cape Government Health Department

Space in Bushradionews

03/03/2020

Bush Radio has places available in its newsroom for volunteer recruits.

Read the following carefully!

*** This is NOT a call for DJs, music show presenters or newsreaders***

Are you:

  • Interested in developing news that matters to the Cape Flats?
  • Curious, adventurous, always looking for a story, willing to hunt down a source, energetic?
  • Able to speak, write and read in English & Afrikaans or Xhosa?
  • Willing to explore new frontiers in media?
  • Able to work hard in a challenging environment?

Would you like to learn how to:

  • Record sound, conduct interviews, compile bulletins, read bulletins, take pictures, record video, cover events and test your skills LIVE to a listening and online audience of over 375 000 people.
  • Develop what it means to be journalist in a changing news environment?
  • If your answer to the above is yes, then a volunteer news trainee position in the Bush Radio newsroom is for you. (Download application form)

Things to pay attention to:

  • You will be required full-time with shifts (06h00 – 14h00 and 10h00 –18h00) – 5 days a week, including weekend and public holiday shifts.
  • You must be available to start immediately.
  • You will not receive payment! This is a full-time trainee position at Africa’s leading community radio station.
  • Transport allowance of R500 per month for 3 months (probation), increased to R 1000 thereafter, non-negotiable for 9 months.
  • Students attending class should not apply.
  • Candidates must be computer literate.
  • Candidates must be Cape Town based.
  • Understand, write and read English and one other language (Afrikaans or Xhosa)

Shortlisted candidates will be put through a combination interview, written test (for computer skills, language, general knowledge) and a voice test at a specified date.

How to submit your application:

Download and complete the CV Application, attach documentation (certificates etc)

In the the subject line write: (name) and (surname) – Newsroom trainee March 2020

Email completed application form to newsrecruit@bushradio.co.za

Application deadline: 12 March 2020 (no late applications will be considered) Bush Radio reserves the right not to make an appointment – Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted – No correspondence will be entered into. If you have been contacted within one week of the closing date you should consider your application unsuccessful.

Bush Radio is the oldest volunteer driven community radio station project in Africa

DOWNLOAD APPLICATION FORM

Related: Working at Radio Station and what it taught me.

Ministers indifferent to the plight of the community radio sector

08/11/2019

The National Community Radio Forum issued a press statement after their meeting with the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) yesterday.

The meeting was held to discuss the current crises with regards to the planned closure of certain community radio stations by the broadcasting authority.

READ NCRF STATEMENT 7 November 2019 – Ministers indifferent to the plight of the #communityradio sector

Again Bush Radio is very concerned about these developments and we believe that a closure of one station is worrying. We call upon all parties involved to look for an amicable solution for the continued survival and growth of the community radio sector.

We also encourage communities, individuals, organisations and businesses to support their community radio stations.

Related:

Community Media demands to be heard

Keep your voice alive

Don’t just like what you hear.

The end of revolutionary radio in South Africa?

The end of revolutionary radio in South Africa?

08/10/2019

The following is an extract from an article by Dan Corder for Africa is a Country.

In the small meeting room buried deep within Bush Radio’s second-floor offices on Victoria Road in Salt River, central Cape Town, and lying alongside an ancient Zenith Trans-Oceanic analog radio are two maroon leather cases.

These cases are marked with the iconic golden dog and gramophone logo of His Master’s Voice, formerly the Victor Talking Machine Company. These cases contain original recordings of speeches, debates, poetry, and music performed by South African anti-apartheid activists—those deemed so dangerous that they were banned from gathering or speaking publicly by the then-government.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

If you would like to see us continue our work or have been touched by it please show your support through a contribution via our GIVEGAIN campaign or directly into our account:

Bank: Standard Bank
Account Name: Bush Radio
Account Number: 07 122 0194
Branch Name: Mowbray
Branch Code: 004909
Bank address: 37 – 39 Main Road, Mowbray, Western Cape, South Africa, 7700
SWIFT address: SBZA ZA JJ

Related:

Community Media demands to be heard

What Africa’s First Community Radio Project, Bush Radio, Needs

Desperate days for local papers, radio

Capetonians asked to help keep Bush Radio going

Don’t just like what you hear

Keep your voice alive

Keep your voice alive

31/07/2019

Always cutting edge, Bush Radio explores issues in an insightful and meaningful way, giving the people of Cape Town access to media that highlights their voices – through music, entertainment, social upliftment and getting hands-on with media training.

The wide range of programming includes human rights, LGBTIQ+, gender, labour, job opportunities, basic health care, entrepreneurship, and offering information deemed necessary by our communities.

Africa’s oldest community radio station project, it was started in the 1980s by community activists and alternative media producers to explore ways in which grassroots media could be used for social upliftment and as an alternative voice during the apartheid era.

Today Bush Radio ensures it remains relevant, necessary and effects change through carefully curated media projects by working with partners to build dynamic programming. These projects include the Children’s Radio Education Workshop, where children aged between 6 and 18 years going live on-air, and the Media Kidocracy Konference where children aged 12 and up are trained to produce media content.

As an incubator for new media talent, Bush Radio has trained many young people from the Cape Flats and beyond who have now moved on into the media industry and beyond, also helping to build young start-ups and artists.

The community media sector is struggling in South Africa and even though Bush Radio is engaging on various levels, including with the government, to find a solution, we need daily costs such as rent, transmission, communication and stipends for the young people to get on-the-job training covered.

Your contribution will go towards ensuring that young people have a place where they can get access to quality media training and experience and that Cape Town’s communities continue to actively contribute to discussions around the issues affecting them.

Related: Community Media demands to be heard

Getting a taste for radio

13/06/2019

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Learner’s from the Sound and Light team at Muizenberg High School got to spend some time at Bush Radio on Wednesday the 12 June.

The young people had the opportunity to interact with the trainees at Bush Radio in all the areas; news, production, on air and presenting. They where roped into a recorded discussion on youth issues where they were able to share their views on Youth Day and the challenges and exciting opportunities facing young people.

Bush Radio’s commitment to developing young people is well known through it’s Children’s Radio Education Workshop and being the first station that provides a direct output for young people to make not just only radio, but all forms of media for themselves.

If your school would like to visit Bush Radio send an email to mother@bushradio.co.za or call 021448540 for more details.

Facebook post

Spread the word #worldpressfreedomday

02/05/2019

wpfd_2019_a3_final_enWorld Press Freedom day (3 May) is a date which celebrates the principles of press freedom, to evaluate and defend the media from attacks on their independence and to pay tribute to journalists who have lost their lives in the exercise of their profession.

World Press Freedom day also acts as a reminder to governments of the need to respect and commitment to press freedom.

It serves as an occasion to inform citizens of violations of press freedom – a reminder that in dozens of countries around the world, publications are censored, fined, suspended and closed down, while journalists, editors and publishers are harassed, attacked, detained and even murdered.

your voice

World Press Freedom Day was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in 1993 following a Recommendation adopted at the twenty-sixth session of UNESCO’s General Conference in 1991. This in turn was a response to a call by African journalists who in 1991 produced the Windhoek Declaration on media pluralism and independence.

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Responding first

05/04/2019
Bush Radio staff and interns took part in a two day workshop to get their level 1 first aid certification. It was hard work but the guys enjoyed it.

We think Kholeka deserves an Oscar for her performance as an injured patient.

Thanks to Donovan from Safe Tech for conducting the course.

Working at Radio Station and what it taught me.

31/01/2019

The following was written by Maryam Adhikarie on her blog about her experience as an intern. (Reposted with permission)

rptnb

It has been months since I updated my blog and it feels really good to get back into the swing of things. Consequently, a few months ago I applied for my first ever real Journalistic job in media. I’d never ever thought any sort of job would change me as much as a person as working in the media industry.

Just finished my 1st year final assignments and rushed over to catch a ride to head over to an interview I never thought I would have gotten. With no prior experience to what an actual interview entails I sat sweating on the seat taking a look at the surroundings and tried not to look like this was my first time.

Think of any police, bad cop, good cop type of scenario where they interrogate the suspect. It felt and looked like that with the interviewer asking questions and the room with the glass windows. I was very unsure on how to behave and the teenager in me at the time could not stop fidgeting. It was a process that I felt took an eternity.

I got the golden phone call, and soon was in training alongside my newly wed colleagues. Thrown straight into editing as much sound as we possibly could. It was a painstaking process of editing sound that I assure you no intern liked, however, it would benefit us immensely later when it came to collecting sound.

screenshot_20190131_130958_com.instagram.android

From editing we were taken outside, which we appreciated. What we did outside was collect sound from people on the streets. A basic question on current affairs asked to as much as people as you can get on record, called a Vox Pops. This is where we learnt how to approach people properly to get there opinions on anything such as sex, sport, politics to circumcision.

I thoroughly enjoyed asking people out on the streets on there opinions about things. It showed me a different perspective on things and made me more knowledgeable about how people think, enforcing the fact that not everyone thinks the same. There are instances where I would not agree with what the person is saying, however, I would reiterate in my mind that it is not my job to disagree, my job is to get a balanced story.

A balanced story is not something I was well equipped for when I started. I had to learn what a balanced story entails. There was so much learning that had to be done, not that my first year of Journalism did not prepare me enough, it is that there is certain things you have to learn in the field when your are thrown into the deep end.

University in essence is a safety net, you can make mistakes, whereas in the media industry or more specifically radio, your name as well as the company is on the line and that is where the pressure comes from. You repeat a year or a module if you fail at University and that is really no ‘biggie’, but in the media industry if you do mess up you may not have a job the next day and no media company would want to hire you after that. Protect your name.

Radio, specifically, sounds pretty easy when you listen to it, however, think of radio as a piano keyboard, anyone can sit down and press down onto the keypads but how terrible will that sound to the ears. You need to know what you doing and it does takes loads of practice. This is called engineering.

Watching presenters engineer for themselves, playing jingles, playing sound and multitasking was an honor to watch. I laugh as I write this sentence because I soon had to engineer for myself and that was, personally, for me, the most difficult but the most rewarding when I knew how. I felt like a puppet controlling the air waves and controlling what you heard, it was and will probably always be the best.

In the couple of months that I was there, news was pouring out of every corner and it would be overwhelming at first. But, overtime you would get familiar with the influx and amount of work put in to bring out your best story. You would learn how to work alongside people. I learnt that you wont be an expert at first everything takes time, some more than others, have patience.

Other than hardship, stress and pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, you also get to meet fellow presidents, ministers and politicians. Particularly in radio, because of the type of radio station I worked at you get to meet loads of different types of people from chefs to singers and dj’s, you really get a nice blend.

Read the original blog post and follow Maryam’s journey on twitter.

Get experience in our newsroom

19/11/2018

RECRUIT news2019 low

Bush Radio has places available in its newsroom for volunteer recruits.

Read the following carefully!

*** This is NOT a call for DJs, music show presenters or newsreaders***

Are you:

  • Interested in developing news that matters to the Cape Flats?
  • Curious, adventurous, always looking for a story, willing to hunt down a source, energetic?
  • Able to speak, write and read in English & Afrikaans or Xhosa?
  • Willing to explore new frontiers in media?
  • Able to work hard in a challenging environment?

Would you like to learn how to:

  • Record sound, conduct interviews, compile bulletins, read bulletins, take pictures, record video, cover events and test your skills LIVE to a listening and online audience of over 375 000 people.
  • Develop what it means to be journalist in a changing news environment?

If your answer to the above is yes, then a volunteer news trainee position in the Bush Radio newsroom is for you. (Download application form)

Things to pay attention to:

  • You will be required full-time with shifts (06h00 – 14h00 and 10h00 –18h00) – 5 days a week, including weekend and public holiday shifts.
  • You must be available to start in January 2019.
  • You will not receive payment! This is a full-time trainee position at Africa’s leading community radio station.
  • Transport allowance of R500 per month for 3 months (probation), increased to R 1000 thereafter, non-negotiable for 9 months.
  • Students attending class should not apply.
  • Candidates must be computer literate.
  • Candidates must be Cape Town based.
  • Understand, write and read English and one other language (Afrikaans or Xhosa)
  • Shortlisted candidates will be put through a combination interview, written test (for computer skills, language, general knowledge) and a voice test at a specified date in December 2018.

How to submit your application:

  1. Download and complete the CV Application, attach documentation (certificates etc)
  2. In the the subject line write: (name) and (surname) – Newsroom trainee January 2019
  3. Email completed application form to news2019@bushradio.co.za

Application deadline: 5 December 2018 (no late applications will be considered)

Bush Radio reserves the right not to make an appointment – Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted – No correspondence will be entered into. If you have been contacted within one week of the closing date you should consider your application unsuccessful.
Bush Radio is the oldest volunteer driven community radio station project in Africa
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