Posts Tagged ‘Children’s Radio Education Workshop’

Engaging on our own terms

17/12/2010

Bush Radio, Africa’s oldest community radio station project will once again host the annual Media Kidocracy Konfrence (MKK) now in its 11th year ­ from the 17th to the 18th December 2010 at its premises in Salt River, Cape Town.

This year the Bush Radio’s children and youth project CREW (Children’s Radio Education Workshop), which takes on the role of host and planning committee for the conference, is presenting a programme called Youth Engagement.

The delegates, aged between 12 and 18 years of age, will explore issues that are pertinent to themselves and their peers under the theme, and have broken the conference into three parallel areas: Business, Music and Media.

Business
This session aims to inspire youth as well as teach them ways of capitalising on their talents and how to be responsible in business.

Music:
Exploring how the youth express themselves in a positive way through music and to help with discovering our rich musical heritage. These sessions will look at independent and signed artists, their experiences and challenges.

Media
Not just the glitz and glam. The sessions will reflect on how all media influences youth, how children and young people are represented in the media and how they wish to be represented. The impact of new media and ideas on how to use it will also be shared.

Former Bush Radio MD, Zane Ibrahim at an early MKK conference

“Whereas previous MKK sessions have concentrated on media and media production, we have noted with interest that this years’ MKK planning committee have included a section on business,” Bush Radio Managing Director Brenda Leonard.

“We feel it shows the impact of the economic crisis on the lives of the youth. They motivated strongly for this section to be included. It is our job of facilitators of young people’s development that we hear their call.”

Background on MKK
As part of a growing need for youth participation in the decision-making process and policy formulation around children’s broadcasting, in 2000 Bush Radio initiated a conference. The Kidocracy (Kid-democracy) name was created for the event – to denote a form of society characterised by social equality and acceptance of young people with representation for and by young people.

The Media Kidocracy Konference aims to establish critical awareness and understanding among young people by exposing youth to information and experiences that will enable them to identify issues they feel are relevant, as well as explore their role in media and social issues. MKK also assists participants in devising strategies for addressing social issues by using the media as a tool to help resolve and address these issues.

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From the archive: Tamara Dey

22/10/2010

This picture was taken at Bush Radio in the mid 2000’s when singer Tamara Dey (centre) visited us as part of the Children’s Radio Education Workshop (CREW).

See if you can spot:

Michael Tshoko, Jill Ockers, Leonie Louw, Springs Mahulutshana, Akhona Ngoqo, Wendy Burnell, Carmen Esau, Cikiswa Njana and Simone Bosman.

Keeping the youth moving

22/07/2010

A youth participant calling his mother- image courtesy of YMM

During the June school holidays, Bush Radio was hard at work with a group of young people in Mitchells Plain from the Youth Media Movement (YMM).

Our former trainee news editor, Nadia Samie who just returned from the University of Southern Illinois in the United States where she completed her Masters in Professional Media and Media Management, conducted three intensive week long training sessions based at Glendale High School and at our studios in Salt River.

The YMM asked Bush Radio to provide media and radio training for the young people due to our experience of training young people in media skills through our Children’s Radio Education Workshop (CREW) project.

We feel that it is essential for all young people to be exposed to this kind of training as media surrounds everyone, shaping their views on issues and their understanding of world events, from TV to radio, and newspapers to using Facebook and Twitter.

This type of training is essential to show young people how to produce media, and it also equips them with the skills to understand and interpret the media messages bombarding them every day.

For most of the young people, this was their first interaction with media production and judging from their enthusiasm, it won’t be their last.

Besides discussing the power and influence of the media, part of the course also entailed making public service announcements (PSAs).

When the participants heard that the Programme Integrator gave approval for their PSAs to be played on air, students excitedly called their parents saying, “ek gaan op die radio wees, sit dit op 89.5fm”.


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